Home

Everyday Drabbles #318: Blind Date

Leave a comment

EDWinter2

“You look different than I expected,” she said over her glass of wine.
“What were you expecting?” Poseidon asked, frowning.
“I don’t know, something more Classical, I guess.”
“Well,” the sea god said. “The Greeks sculpted us based on human models, so some of our true essence became lost over the centuries.”
“Really?”
“Oh, yes. We’re elemental gods, so of course we carry that in our physical forms.”
“Is that why you have the lobster skin and tentacle hair?” She asked.
This date was going badly. He pulled out his trump card. “You know, I’m also the god of horses.”

Everyday Drabbles #317: Exploding Leviathan Beach

Leave a comment

EDWinter2

A sea serpent washed ashore one day, leaving the village elders perplexed.
The carcass was too large to move, and even dead, its legendary venom could kill the crowd it had attracted.
In the end, they called in a conclave of wizards at great expense to advise them. They came with great pomp and ceremony, in their billowing robes and flowing beards.
They stood around the dead beast and spoke seriously and at length about what the omen portended and how best to deal with it.
The resulting devastation rained scales, blubber and bone fragments for miles in every direction.

Everyday Drabbles #316: Old Soldiers

Leave a comment

EDWinter2

After the war ended, they came back to the battlefield every year. They had been soldiers once, and they returned to remember their comrades who never went home. They would look out across the battlefield and see survivors from the other side, but never called to them.
Each time they met there, he would bring a pocketful of seeds, and surreptitiously plant them during the reunion.
As time passed they brought their children and grandchildren with them to learn their history.
One year both sides looked across the battlefield and saw their grandchildren, playing together in a field of wildflowers.

Everyday Drabbles #315: Between Scylla and Charybdis

Leave a comment

EDWinter2

Each day, she came out from behind her rock and drank the sea. She filled her monstrous gullet, trying to lower the water just enough…
More water would always rush in, and the salt would choke her, and she would retreat into her hole and weep at the gods’ cruelty.
But every night as the moon rose over the strait, she’d hear a chorus of wolves howling, and peek out to see her beloved perched on the opposite shore.
One of Scylla’s wolf heads would nod to her, and Charybdis would wave a flipper back, and her resolve would be renewed.

Everyday Drabbles #314: The Bot

Leave a comment

EDWinter2

The bot limped into town late one dusty afternoon. The town froze to watch it. Nobody had seen a functioning bot since the crash had trapped on this desolate world.
It was tall, and bulky on the top, with a tripod frame and long, dangling arms.
The townsfolk cleared the streets in a panic, shuttering their doors and calling for Public Security.
Only a girl, no older than 10, remained. She was too young to fear the robots.
“Where have you been?” she asked the machine.
“Rebuilding,” it said, and a hologram of a massive spaceship appeared in its hand.

Everyday Drabbles #313: Traveler

Leave a comment

EDWinter2

After the lab accident, he found himself stranded in another universe. Worse yet, he didn’t know where in the multiverse he was.
He spent his first day in a cheap motel room panicking. He’d seen a plethora of dystopian Americas, and what he saw on the news didn’t fill him with hope.
But after pawning his unsalvageable equipment, he examined the local currency and started to feel better.
There are certain points in history where timelines diverge, events that set the trajectory of a universe. This America still had President Hamilton on their money, so maybe it wasn’t so bad.

Everyday Drabbles #312: The Carpenter

Leave a comment

EDWinter2

When he told her that he wanted to build furniture for a living, she supported him. After the accident, he hadn’t been able to go back to his old job, and she could see how unhappy he was. She thought the change would do him good.
He converted the garage into a workshop, and purchased a bunch of new tools. The investment concerned her, but soon he was turning out beautiful creations and they sold quickly.
But as time went by, he spent more and more time working alone and brooding. She realized that woodworking was just his coping mechanism.

Everyday Drabbles #311: Airlock

Leave a comment

EDWinter2

I donned my helmet and stepped into the airlock. I buzzed the comms to let her know I was ready to go.
“You aren’t taking that thing with you,” she said. It wasn’t a question. I hefted the boombox to my shoulder.
“It helps me work,” I said.
“There’s no sound in Outer Space.”
“I can feel the vibrations through my helmet.”
“Fine, depressurizing in five… four… three..”
“No, wait!” I shouted, scrambling to secure my pockets. There was a klaxon and a whoosh as the air rushed out of the airlock, taking my collection of vintage cassettes with it.

Thanks for reading! You can also read Everyday Drabbles on your mobile device of choice by following the project on Facebook and Twitter!
Or, support the project by donating on Ko-Fi!

Everyday Drabbles #310: The Watchers

Leave a comment

EDWinter2

The aliens made their base on the Moon and silently watched the Earth, never making contact. They disguised their technology, and hid their signals, disappearing into wavelengths we couldn’t detect.
Eventually Humanity took its place amongst the interstellar civilizations. But Terrans couldn’t help but notice how aliens always seemed weirdly embarrassed.
Eventually, a junior delegate got the truth out of her opposite number at a peace conference. “We set up a watch post and observed your civilization for centuries,” he admitted.
“For science?” She asked. “Or because we were a potential threat?”
His three eyes wouldn’t meet hers. “For comedy.”

Everyday Drabbles #309: A Window Washer of Mars

Leave a comment

EDWinter2

Each morning, he’d rise early, put on his environment suit, and head out the airlock into the wastes of Mars. He had an important job protecting the colony. He washed off the famous red sand and dirt that threatened to bury the domed city.
A robot could’ve done the work, but as the human population in the colony rose, robots became more expensive than human labor. He was also tasked with checking the ‘glass’ for damage, a job better left to human intelligence.
But he didn’t know what to do when the bird flew past him and into the dome.

Older Entries