Home

Podcast: CCR41-Revenge of the Zombies

Leave a comment

Tonight your hosts, Hugh of HughJODonnell.com, Rich the Time Traveler, Opopanax, and Jurd, must use a hidden ritual to survive this truly revolting film.

Click HERE to listen!

And if you must, click HERE to watch this dreadful movie.

This podcast was originally posted on 12/5/2017 at Skinner.FM.

Chrononaut Cinema Reviews is presented by http://skinner.fm and http://hughjodonnell.com, and is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 Unported License.

Thank you for listening! If you enjoyed this podcast, please rate and review us on your favorite podcatcher!

Advertisements

Hugh Likes Fiction: Killing Is My Business

Leave a comment

Killing Is My Business

Written by Adam Christopher

Published by Tor

The Skinny: Christopher’s follow-up to Made To Kill is another rollicking robot noir set in 1960’s L.A.

Ray Electromatic is the last functioning robot in1960’s Los Angeles, and he’s the world’s only robot private detective. At least, that’s what his business cards say. His real job is assassination. With his trusty computer/business partner Ada, he finds his target and gets the job done. But when Rays targets start turning up dead or missing before he can complete the job, he starts to wonder who he can really trust.

Christopher returns to his post-robotics Los Angeles for a second novel that is as much of a noire delight as the first. Like all good detective novels, it doesn’t rely on having read Made To Kill, while pushing Ray’s story forward in some fun and interesting ways. The author has a knack for voice, and he balances the 60’s sci-fi and noire elements superbly. Ray’s momento-like limitation, the fact that his memory tape only lasts 24 hours, is used to good effect in this story, and requires Ray to engage in a fair amount of trust, something that always goes awry in a noire world.

Killing Is My Business is a cracking read, and you can pick it up from your local bookstore, or download a copy from Amazon.

Thanks for reading this article! If you enjoyed it, please share it! You can also support me on Patreon if you don’t mind paying a ludicrous extra fee!

Hugh Likes Comics: Fence

Leave a comment

Fence #1
Written by C. S. Pacat
Drawn by Joanna The Mad
Colored by Joana Lafuente
Published by Boom Studios

Fance

The Skinny: The by the numbers sports comic calls to mind “Yuri On Ice,” but is coy in the first issue.

Fence is the story of scrappy young fencer Nicholas Cox. He’s from the wrong side of the tracks and hasn’t had the best training, but he’s got raw talent. He also has the luck to face fencing prodigy Seiji Katayama in his first tournament bout.
“Fence” is a teen sports comic about, obviously, fencing, that dutifully hits the story beats it needs to in the first issue without much fanfare. We get a lot of the main character’s back story, a very nice competition sequence, and a last page setup for the series, and it all works. The comic has a very pure shonen sports manga vibe to it. It reminded me most strongly of “Yuri on Ice,” but the text doesn’t feel completely committed to the idea yet. Although based on the queer fantasy trilogy that are C. S. Pacat’s breakout work, one shouldn’t be surprised.
Fans of this subgenre will find plenty to like, though, and Joanna The Mad’s art is clean and expressive, lingering on emotional scenes notes. Her figures are fluid and dynamic, and Joana Lafuente’s colors bring them out well.
Fence #1 is now available from Comixology or your local comics shop. Time will tell if this sports manga inspired book will stand out from the crowd, but this is a solid, if not surprising, introduction.

Podcast: Nostalgia Pilots Bonus 02

Leave a comment

Bonus Episode 2: Gundam Versus

Hugh and Jason take a break from regular Nostalgia Pilots duties to discuss the latest PS4 Gundam offering: Gundam Versus! Get their reviews, impressions, and what they felt was missing in the game. Hint: it’s a horse piloting a horse mobile suit.

Hugh Likes Comics: Made Men

Leave a comment

Made Men #1
Written by Paul Tobin
Drawn by Arjuna Susini
Colored by Gonzalo Duarte
Published by Oni

mademen

Frankenstein Revenge Noir. It’s a beautiful concept, and Tobin and Susini pull it off brilliantly in “Made Men.” The book opens with a bloodbath, a hit on a team of police officers. The whole squad is mercilessly gunned down. But the squad’s leader isn’t exactly who she says she is. She’s a Frankenstein, and after one of her grandmother’s recipes allows her to survive the bullets, she’s entering the family business to get revenge.
Tobin’s script goes off at just the right clip to toss us into this revenant revenge tale. Susini’s art is a perfect tonal match, gritty and visceral with just the right level of gore. Duarte’s colors are muted and lurid, exactly like the old school pulp the story evokes.
As a collaborative medium, a comic works best when the art and text either support each other completely, or diverge in interesting ways. “Made Men” does the former, and it is exquisite. We get some outstanding montages, as Jutte Frankenstein narrates on top of the gothic-noir art. If you’re a fan of classic noir or classic horror, this is a fantastic start to something you won’t want to miss. You can find Made Men #1 at your Local Comics Shop, or digitally through Comixology!
Thanks for reading this article! If you enjoyed it, please share it! You can also support me on Patreon for more goodies!

Hugh Likes Video Games: Gundam Wing Endless Duel

Leave a comment

HLV-Gundam Wing Endless Duel
Bandai
Super Famicom

hqdefault.jpg

Invariably, Nostalgia Pilots’ deep dive into the series lead me back to the ephemera and tie-ins to Gundam Wing, including the Super Famicom fighting game. Bandai hasn’t had the best track record with Gundam games, but Gundam Wing Endless Duel turned out to be pretty great.
A late 16-bit era fighting game in the vein of Street Fighter II, “Gundam Wing Endless Duel” never made it to America. This is almost certainly because the anime it is based on wouldn’t be localized for another three years after it was released. But it’s also a shame, because it’s a great 2-player fighter, with tight controls, gorgeous pixel graphics, and a merciless difficulty curve.
Roughly following the plot of the show, the game features nine characters, plus a hidden playable boss. Each giant robot has a pair of light and heavy attacks, can rocket boost into the air, and fires machine guns from a distance. They also have a fuel meter, and all special and super attacks drain the gauge. Successfully blocking attacks or landing hits refills the gauge, but it doesn’t fill back up between rounds. This prevents a player from just leaning on special attacks for victory and provides some nice game balance.
The personality and capabilities of each pilot and robot are well displayed. Wing and Wing Zero have giant guns, their signature beam sabres, and can even transform into their jet modes to ram the enemy. Deathscythe is fast and excels at close-combat, Qatre has access to his army of bodyguards, etc. The stages are all pulled right from the show. Each one is incredibly detailed and downright beautiful. Heero fights inside a colony, Zechs’ stage is an Antarctic ice sheet, and Wu-Fei fights in the wilderness he spends most of the first half of the show moping in.
“Gundam Wing Endless Duel” looks and feels just right, but it isn’t a walk in the park. The computer A I is brutal and merciless. The challenge is further amped up by the fact that unlike other tournament fighters, players can hit their opponent when they’re down.
If you’re a serious fighting game player, and you need something to tide you over until the next big thing comes out, I recommend taking a look for this overlooked gem.

Thanks for reading this article. If you enjoyed it, please share it! You can also support me on Patreon for more articles, fiction, and other goodies!

Hugh Likes Fiction: Lincoln in the Bardo

Leave a comment

Hugh Likes Fiction-Lincoln in the Bardo

Lincoln in the Bardo
Written by George Saunders
Full Cast Audiobook
Published by Penguin Random House

Lincoln in the Bardo is less a novel of The Civil War than it is a novel about life (and death) surrounding the war. It is set on the night following the burial of William Lincoln, the president’s son who died of Typhoid, and follows the many ghosts that dwell in Oak Hill Cemetery.
The ghosts, all trapped between life and death by their earthly desires and attachments, observe and interact with the spirit of the boy and the mourning Lincoln, who returns that night. A mixture of fantasy and historical record, Saunders intersperses the true event of the president’s mourning with the lives of his fictional ghosts and excerpts from memoirs and accounts of the period. The result is both cacophonous and elegantly executed. Much like the spirits who deny what is in front of them, the country is caught on the edge of monumental change, change that is nearly impossible, but necessary. Acceptance and reaction to those changes, both for the living and the dead, is the crux of the story.
The audiobook of Lincoln in the Bardo is a full cast recording that really takes advantage of the nature of the book. a huge cast of actors create a chorus of voices. The dizzying variety of their opinions and backgrounds reflect the diverse stories of the characters very well. The mood is well established, and it really sets the atmosphere for the story. The cast is anchored by Nick Offerman, David Sedaris, and Saunders himself as three spirits who are most active in the story. The rest of the cast is a crowd of voices both recognizable and unknown, and is excellently produced.
Lincoln in the Bardo is available in audio and print from Audible and your local independent book store. I recommend giving it a listen, or a read.

Thanks for reading this article. If you enjoyed it, please share it! You can also support me on Patreon for more articles, short fiction and podcasts!

 

Older Entries