Deadpool 2
Directed by David Leitch
Starring Ryan Reynolds, Josh Brolin, Zazie Beetz

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The Skinny: This sequel to the 2016 surprise hit takes far fewer risks than the original, but it has a lot of fun playing in the 90’s X-Men toy box.

Deadpool 2 is a fun action comedy, if a bit stuck in the formula of the original. This action-adventure-comedy routine follows Wade Wilson, (Reynolds) a regenerating mercenary living entirely outside of the fourth wall, as he struggles to find a purpose after a tragedy and stumbles into the life of 14-year old mutant Russell Collins, who is being raised in an abusive orphanage and also being hunted by Cable, a cyborg from the future (Brolin.)
As you might expect from the above description, “Deadpool 2” deals with some heavy material, poorly. But while it does dip its toes into some extremely vile and worn-out comics tropes, it does actually subvert them, for the most part. In one particular case, it avoids a pitfall that “Avengers: Infinity War” plows right into. Deadpool 2 is crass, but at this point you should know what you’re getting into, and it at least tries to have some heart.
The movie does a good job staying lighthearted in the face of some weighty subjects, and the fight sequences are all over the top fun. Deadpool’s corner of the X-Men universe is full of complicated, confusing, and downright contradictory continuity, and the movie does a great job of presenting just enough for the characters to work in context. Particularly great is Zazie Beetz’s turn as Domino, a mercenary with luck powers who lands her gags with aplomb.
Deadpool 2 doesn’t break a lot of new ground, but it’s a welcome popcorn flick for fans of the original, or fans of that magical time in superhero comics called ‘the 90’s.’

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